Chapter 6- Verbs AND Mood

Yes! A verb can be in a mood but the mood of a verb does not tell us how a verb feels. It rather tells us how the person who is acting the verb, feels. Mood of Verbs   The moods of a verb have completely different names than a person’s mood.   Indicative Verbs are used when we state a fact.   For example:   I biked I bike I will bike   Imperative Verbs are used when we tell someone []

Chapter 5- Active and Passive Voice and Verbs

Verbs, Active, and Passive   A verb can either be active or passive. When the verb is active then the subject of the sentence actually does something.   For example: Maria hit the ball out of the park. Michaela sang a song.   To make a verb passive you just add some form of ‘to be’ to the verb.   For example:   The dog was walked The dog is walked The dog will be walked   This lesson is very important []

Chapter 5- Active and Passive Voice and Verbs

Verbs, Active, and Passive   A verb can either be active or passive. When the verb is active then the subject of the sentence actually does something.   For example: Maria hit the ball out of the park. Michaela sang a song.   To make a verb passive you just add some form of ‘to be’ to the verb.   For example:   The dog was walked The dog is walked The dog will be walked   This lesson is very important []

Chapter 4- Lesson 1- Verbals

Verbals   A verbal is just a label for something that has to do with a verb.   Verbal Phrases are phrases that begin with verbs. There are three types of Verbal Phrases:   Gerunds Participles Infinitives     Gerunds A gerund is a noun that turns into a verb. You just add –ing to it. For example:   Run = Running Think = Thinking Play = Playing   Participles A Participle is a verb that turns into an adjective. There are []

Robert Germaux – Author Interview

Robert Germaux Author Interview Please tell us about One by One This is a very frustrating case for Daniel and his squad. There are multiple victims who appear to have almost nothing in common, and although the killer leaves a “clue” at each crime scene, those clues likewise appear to be completely disconnected from each other. It’s only through hard work and determination that Daniel and his colleagues eventually realize that they need to change their focus in order to catch the []

Chapter 2: Lesson 3: Possessive Pronouns

Possessive Pronouns   A Possessive Pronoun shows that something belongs to someone. Examples of some can be as followed: Mine, Yours, His, Hers, Ours, and Theirs.   For instance:   The last piece of pizza is mine.   I think this dirty shirt is yours.   Sally wanted everyone to know the new pet cat was hers.   The problems I face with most authors when I go through their manuscripts is vague pronouns.   Examples:   Jessica wanted to get a []


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