The Secret of Rosalita Flats by Tim W. Jackson (Book Review #848)

The secret of Rosalita Flats is a mystery humor set on a small Caribbean island, and it’s about Cal. He is a watchmaker and has inherited a big house he wants to get rid of. All he wants is to get off Blacktip Island and pay off his creditors. Things, however, do not go as he plans.

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Inspiration by Donald Furrow-Scott

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After four years of writing four novels and fully outlining four more, a calm is overcoming my muse this summer. It is not a fit of writer’s block, in fact, quite the opposite. Nor is it some furor poeticus​ that will result in yet another stress-squozen pandemic novel.

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River Town Girl by Lynn Litterine (Book Review #847)

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River town girl is a memoir about the author growing up in the Hudson River around the 1950s, 60’s and the early 70’s. The author takes us on a journey explaining her life in a very principal and poetic way. She comes from a working-class family and shares intimate details such as her first kissing experience in an honest way.

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A little conversation by Bluette Matthey

I come from a heritage of story tellers.  Author Gene Stratton Porter is part of my family tree, but more closely and importantly, my father was an amazing raconteur who enthralled his family and friends with tales of his youth in the small Ohio town where he was born and raised.

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A Grand Exposition by Kim Idynne (Book Review #845)

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A grand exposition is a historical mystery set at the 1889 World’s Fair. It begins with Elizabeth, who has recently lost her husband and son. She moves to Delhi with her daughter, Charlotte, and is told to stay away from the Indian neighborhoods. Things take a turn when Elizabeth falls ill, and Charlotte returns to the hotel only to notice that everything is changed. Her mother is gone, the room looks different, and no one believes anything she says.

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After All – It’s All About Mauzzy by B. T. Polcari

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As we built up to the launch of Against My Better Judgment, I was asked a lot of questions such as what motivated me to write the book (short answer – my wife and daughter); where do the character names come from; and what did I enjoy most about writing the book. My answer to this last question was twofold: 1) I loved creating characters that I could bring to life through their actions and dialogue; and 2) I especially loved writing Mauzzy into the story.  

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A Child of the Cold War: Code Name: Kitten by Cathy O’Bryan (Book Review #844)

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A child of the cold war is a historical fiction based on a real family dealing with the cold war intruding in their seemingly normal life. Emmy, a teenager, is unaware that she has high-level CIA agents’ parents, wanted by the Nazi sympathizers.

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An encouraging bio for authors by Karl Loveridge

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I remember one day coming home, as a bright-eyed 10-year old, and declaring I liked Star Wars more than I liked KISS (i.e., the rock band). It’s funny as a kid you have to pick favorites like that. Looking back at that moment, I see how that was a critical fork in the road for many decisions I’d face in my future—including eventually becoming a writer.

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Seven Rules of Time Travel Roy Huff (Book Review #843)

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Seven rules of time travel is a science fiction story about Quinn Black. He has the power to travel through time and even change the future. With this power in his hands, his opportunities become endless. However, he does not calculate that there are specific rules in changing the past and altering the future, which creates a dynamic, touching story of this character and the decisions he makes.

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