THE BIRD THAT SANG IN COLOR by Grace Mattioli (Book Review #912)

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The bird that sang in color is the story of Donna. She has a particular image of what a perfect life looks like and imposes this thought on her brother Vincent. As she works hard to provide these things, she fails, and that guilt trips her until she finds a book of sketches he’s made of his life, allowing her to discover what truly makes him happy.

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Real Life: We breathe, We sleep, We eat … And In-between, We Live by Jill Reid (Book Review #913)

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Real-life is a self-help book about the possibility of making a fresh start in life and creating another chance for being happy and content in life. It is easy to get caught up in the routine of things, and when things fall apart, we tend to forget the initial idea we had in wanting to be peaceful and remain balanced.

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THE BIRD THAT SANG IN COLOR by Grace Mattioli

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The Bird that Sang in Color is the story of a woman who creates the life she always wanted and then leaves it behind when she discovers the secret to living free. Donna, in her early teens, decides that having a fulfilling life is contingent upon having a family, a nice house, and a dignified career. She decides this for her and her older brother, Vincent, an artistic type who she doesn’t perceive as someone capable of getting these things on his own. As she goes about acquiring these things through the course of her lifetime, he remains single, childless, working low-paid jobs, and subsisting in cramped apartments or boarding homes. She harbors guilt for her supposed failure to improve his life until she finds a book of sketches he’d made of his life which allows her to discover his internal joy and prompts her own journey of living authentically.

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Betty P. Notzon

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My love of words started with President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Watching his speeches on TV as a little girl, I was bowled over by the big words he used. Words, I suspect, like deficit, congressional inquiry, and fiscal responsibility, words still being heard in D.C . . . . I wanted to be able to use big words too, though not necessarily those. Sure, sure, my mother reading to me as a child deserves some credit. But, really, it all started with Ike.

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Out of the London Mist by Lyssa Medana (Book Review #911)

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Out of the London mist is a steampunk tale about John Farnley, an aether pilot who travels back to his family home when he hears that his brother, Lord Nicholas Farnley, is murdered. He attempts to take over the family business and financial matters as Nicholas’ wife, Clara, grieves her loss. By inheriting the title, John once rejected, he now has his hands full.

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KINGS, CONQUERORS, PSYCHOPATHS From Alexander to Hitler to the Corporation by Joseph N. Abraham MD (Book Review #910)

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Kings, conquerors, psychopaths is a non-fiction, historical book providing us a realistic look at how leaders and rulers brutally controlled us and how many of the same characteristics are displayed in the tyrants and cooperations we have today. The book introduces us to a prospective approach on how money is now the controlling oppressor.

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Drawing the line: No Ladies in Room A3 by CLARE SCOPES (Book Review #909)

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Drawing the line is a historical fiction about Maggie Goodwin. The story is set in 1938, and no ladies are working as animators at Harley Studios, Los Angeles. Maggie wants to prove everyone wrong.        

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Against My Better Judgment by B.T. Polcari (Book Review #907)

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Against my better judgment is a mystery, young adult fiction story about Sara Donavan, a freshman at the University of Alabama. She also works part-time at a museum gift shop. After purchasing a funerary mask, she receives a mysterious phone call, and that’s when she realizes her find is a unique stolen artifact. A once thought cheap souvenir is now a hot commodity, and to add more fun to the mix, a dashing teacher assistant joins the university.

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Gunmetal Gods by Zamil Akhtar (Book Review #906)

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Gunmetal Gods is a dark fantasy story about Kevah, who is summoned by The Shah. Kevah agrees to train a militia enlisting his daughter to save the royal capital Kostany from the rival enemy. When Micah attacks Kostany, the sorcerer Aschere is stronger than Kevahs defense, and hence the battles end up with too much loss. Kevah then accompanies Sadie, Shah’s daughter, to take revenge and also take back the city.

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