Non- Fiction

Seven Visual Steps to Yes by Janet Miller Wiseman (Book Review #17)

Seven visual steps to yes is a reinforced and redesigned format of a user-friendlier book in an attempt to resolve conflict in relationships. Even if a couple is struggling to decide where to place their Christmas tree this year, Janet Wiseman is here to save the day!   Before starting to use the seven steps you first have to define the conflict to resolve it. Once that is clarified, then there is a formula of which this book goes into detail on, []

Book Review: Blind to Succeed

Originally posted on Bookish Reveries:
Blind to Succeed by Michael Atkins is a book examining what it takes to achieve personal success. It falls under the “self-help” genre. The book is divided into 30 short, succinct, and crisp chapter The book talks about how to overcome your fears, how to change your perspective, how to win your inner game etc. Pretty much all the themes one can expect in a motivational book are explored in the book. .Being an avid reader of self-help,…

Shatterproof by Rianne Moss (Book Review #89)

Shatterproof is a beautiful book written about addiction and drug abuse. Natalie Meyer is young and suffering from, this dependence. This was not how she started, though. A series of heartfelt occurrences in her life begin to shake this young girls heart and mind causing her to fall in such a path. Natalie has a history of sexual abuse and lacks any love or support from her family. Her father throws her out into the street. This vulnerable girl has nowhere to []

Universal Human Rights – A Comparative Research

  We are delighted to announce the publication of Allameh M. T. Ja’fari’s book titled “Universal Human Rights – A Comparative Research.” As you may already know, Muhammad Taqi Ja’fari is a well-known scholar. He has written 41 books in addition to his 15-volume interpretation of Rumi’s, Mathnavi, and a 27-volume translation and interpretation of the Nahj-ul-balaqah.   Mr. Ja’fari’s progress in his field was so spectacular that he was conferred with the greatest degree of jurisprudence by the age of 23. []