Gustave Flaubert: The Ambiguity of Imagination by Giuseppe Cafiero (Book Review #425)

The Ambiguity of Imagination is a meta literature story. It is written about Harel-bey, a character in one of Monsieur Bouvard’s stories which happens to come alive taking revenge on all the other protagonists, the author has written.

I thoroughly enjoyed this story. It is probably the second time where I read something similar to this concept. Here, Harel is upset about the author writing a novel which he never finished, leaving him as an incomplete character.

One thing is for sure, the literature was strong, and I believe that if the reader is not familiar with the author’s writing, then they would find it difficult to follow through. The author creates strong characters that each work on its own, presenting a convincing hold on to the storyline. The workflows well, and the piece comes together with a much-delighted ending.

At first, the work may puzzle you. However, after reading a few more pages, you reach an unsuspected depth of emotional turmoil risen from the storyline. This amazing concept innovates your mind and creates this delightful experience which a book should consequently make you feel after reading it.

I recommend this book to people that like stories that are out of their ordinary context.

Written by Jeyran Main

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1 reply »

  1. Yes, well described. Flaubert’s strong characters will stay with you thorough a lifetime. Likely his most famous work would be “Madame Bovary,” and for some reason I sometimes think about the Mdme. Bovary’s father character first. The brief aside about death of the father’s wife, and his life thereafter sticks with me. But yes, like many novels of Flaubert’s era, the writing can seem more dense than “usual” to us today. Sometimes makes me wonder if it’s WE who are getting denser.

    Liked by 1 person

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